The Back Road

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    This post is by Clint Watson, former art gallery owner and founder of BoldBrush, known for FASO Artist Websites, the leading provider of professional artist websites, the $38,000+ BoldBrush Painting Competition and the free daily art marketing newsletter, FineArtViews. As a self-proclaimed "art fanatic", Clint delights that BoldBrush's San Antonio, Texas office is full of original art, as is his home office. You can connect with Clint on TwitterFacebook or his personal blog at clintavo.com

     

    As we all adjust to the new normal after having been sequestered in our homes, we're all finding alternate ways to make the most of our time.  So let's ask ourselves:  How can we use this time to get better? How can we be of service and use?   I know, without a doubt that great art is being created around the world at this very moment.  Perhaps by you!  Our entire team is focused 100% on whatever we can do to help you market and sell more art.  With that in mind, we're focusing FineArtViews on sales and marketing ideas more than ever before.  The following article was selected from our archives as it seems quite timely in the current situation and provides ideas we think you can use to improve your own art marketing.

     

     

     

    Imagine you're driving down a busy interstate highway.  The congested roads demand your concentration and billboards shout at you from all directions, trying to entice you to exit and part with your money.  This is mass marketing, and every exit promises a Chili's, a Home Depot, a McDonald's and a Starbucks.


    Now imagine you're driving down a secluded country back road.  There are no billboards, no traffic, no Starbucks.  Occasionally, you might see other people - kindred spirits with whom you have something in common: a love of the road less traveled, and indeed a shared interest in this particular road.


    All of a sudden, you see a bright green sign in front of a bright green treehouse that promises "The Best Banana Bread on the Planet."  Do you stop?  Of course you do!  Things like this are exactly why you take the back road.


    This metaphor is actually real, and the road is the Road to Kahakuloa Village on Maui.  Many parts of the road are only one-car width wide. [1]   My wife and I were delighted to find Julia's Banana Bread that day.  Certainly much happier than if we had found yet another Chili's or Starbucks!

     

     


    Julia's Roadside Banana Bread "Treehouse"


    Here's the thing:  "working" on your "SEO Keywords", measuring user engagement, pouring over Google Analytics graphs, working on increasing the number of "Facebook Likes" and trying to "reduce bounce rate."  Those are all mass marketing activities.  If you're Starbucks, you should be worried about your bounce rate.


    But, unless you're Thomas Kinkade, marketing your art is a back road activity.


    And, face it, you're not Starbucks, and you're not Thomas Kinkade.  And that's a wonderful thing.


    So why do you insist on setting up your bright green shack next to the interstate and then wonder why the cars zoom by without even glancing at you?


    Be like Julia instead.  Find your back road.  The one where your kindred souls travel.  And then sell them the "Best Artwork on the Planet."


    Until next time, please remember that Fortune Favors the Bold Brush.



    Sincerely,


    Clint Watson

    FASO Founder, Software Craftsman, Art Fanatic


    PS - "How many eyeballs are passing by is a useless measure. All that matters is, "how many people want to hear from you tomorrow?" - Seth Godin http://faso.com/brushbuzz/links/6952


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    Footnote:


    [1]  So, along many parts of the road to Kahahuloa Village, because the road is so narrow, if you meet an oncoming car, the person going uphill is obliged to back up until there is enough room to pull off the road.  That's because it's easier to see behind you when backing up downhill.  What if the road is flat you ask?  It never is, you're always going uphill or downhill.  It's awesome.  Rent a jeep.  Stop often.

     

     

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     Editor's note:  

    Today's post is an updated version from a few years ago, but we're republishing it again today because it's still a timely and relevant message.  Enjoy.  And if you want to start marketing your art, a professional and secure website can be your most valuable tool.  FASO is the easiest way to build and maintain a gorgeous website, we also include amazing marketing tools that automate many common marketing tasks for you. To sign up for a free, no obligation 30 day trial, click here.






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