THE ECSTASY AND THE AGONY: Your Creative Cycle at Work

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    This post is by Luann Udell, regular contributing author for FineArtViews. She's blogged since 2002 about the business side--and the spiritual inside--of art. She says, "I share my experiences so you won't have to make ALL the same mistakes I did...."  For ten years, Luann also wrote a column ("Craft Matters") for The Crafts Report magazine (a monthly business resource for the crafts professional) where she explored the funnier side of her life in craft. She's a double-juried member of the prestigious League of New Hampshire Craftsmen (fiber & art jewelry). Her work has appeared in books, magazines, and newspapers across the country and she is a published writer.

     

     

     

    Not all parts of the creative process are fun...

     

    (5 minute read)

     

    For the past week or so, my partner has been working feverishly on a new project.

     

    He’s in high-tech, and the work he does is highly creative. Now, I can almost see some of you cringe. “He’s a nerd! NOT an artist!” I’ve heard that from people before. Sometimes I try to set them straight.

     

    He is an extremely talented writer, who started off as an English major, tried his hand at fiction, but soon slid into non-fiction. He was awarded a prestigious Hopwood Award at the University of Michigan, a year or so after we met. His work was so good, it didn’t fit into any of their categories—so they created a new one, just for him. (He bought his first computer with the prize money.)

     

    Yes, a computer. Because after he graduated, he worked in a department for the university. When the data management guy quit, Jon took over—and eventually taught himself coding. His superpower is using an open-source (“available for anyone to use or adapt”) information system, usually developed by others, and finding ways to create unique applications that meet the unique needs of each client he works with (“integration”). He has a skill for taking a product, and seeing the potential, usually outside of the original maker’s scope. He makes important work faster and easier for others.

     

    If you don’t think developing new software to assist people in their creative work, that it isn’t creative in itself, please remember who the owner/developer of this blog is, and what he does, okay? (Hint: FASO? Clint Watson?)

     

    He’s working on a new project. Typical of him, he dove into it headfirst, staying up late, getting up early, spending hours and hours in his workspace, on fire with this new idea and process he wants to bring into the world.

     

    Then he finished it, exulting in all the issues, roadblocks, and problems he solved in the process.

     

    Then, he crashed. He’s been in a deep depression ever since.

     

    Okay, that’s the backstory. Where’s the creative lesson here?

     

    This can be a normal part of the creative cycle process.

     

    There are many different creative cycles.

     

    I took a workshop years ago with a creativity coach, Lyedie Geer. You can read more about her work at thelongingsproject.com. Here is the recommendation I wrote for her the next day:

     

    “Last night I attended an amazing presentation by Integral Coach, Lyedie Geer. The focus was time management for creative people. I attended with much prejudice, assuming we were going to learn about day planners and Google calendar. I was prepared to be bored stiff and take away a nice idea or two. Well, Lyedie blew my socks off. Her presentation gave me a deeper understanding of my creative process, and how to use that understanding to focus even more on my creative and professional goals. Her information is the kind I would attend to many, many times, as I would 'hear' something different every time. The content is powerful, and Lyedie's presentation style is earnest and heartfelt. Our entire audience of creative professionals (web designers, commercial photographers, graphic artists, etc.) stood up and applauded when she finished.”

     

    Welp, then we moved, and I can’t find my notes. But when I do, I’ll share the graph that brought such amazement into my life. (Check back later in the comments section below!)

     

    There are other graphs and arcs and diagrams, of course, and many of them are good. But here’s the most important take-away:

     

    You creative process cycle may be as unique as YOU.

     

    The graph I learned was complex. The gist of it is, we start with the spark of a new idea, we go through experimental phases to explore it, figure out how to do it, how to perfect it.

     

    And then, somewhere along the line we run into obstacles and setbacks. We get discouraged. We’re baffled, stymied, and frantic.

     

    Many people walk away at this point. They believe they are too stupid to figure it out. They don’t see how it will make money, so why do it? They believe it’s just too hard, and so not possible. Or they postpone it until “the kids are grown” or “I retire”, when they believe they’ll finally have the time to devote to their creative work.

     

    But perseverance pays off, we rise again, and we might just end up bringing something new into our work, our lives, and the lives of others.

     

    And the cycle repeats.

     

    In Jon’s case, he goes through this with determination and focus. I don’t think I’ve ever seen him stuck for long, because he keeps at it until he figures it out.

     

    HIS funk arrives at the end, after he’s accomplished his goals.

     

    He’s exhausted. It’s not clear it will be received well. It’s not certain it will catch.

     

    That’s because it’s happened before: Major breakthroughs that get chucked (by others), don’t gather the approval of management. Don’t make it to the finish line. (Years ago, the entire company he worked for shut down forever, two days before he could launch his biggest project.) So maybe there’s that dread for him at the end of all his efforts.  (When it does make it through, people/clients love what he’s accomplished.)

     

    Or maybe he’s depleted from lack of sleep, exhausted by a 100% effort. Kinda like how awful it is after you cross that marathon line, when your body lets you know how much pain it’s really in.....

     

    But here’s the thing: This is his cycle. My heart aches for him, that he goes through so much emotional pain and physical exhaustion at the end. But this is how he creates.

     

    I know, when another glimmer of a great idea appears, he will go after it with all his heart.

     

    So when things get hard, when it feels like no one wants our work, when it feels like we aren’t “enough”, take some time to think...  Maybe you are at the hard part of your creative cycle.

     

    Do what it takes to help you stay the course. Don’t accept “failure” as a measure of your success. It’s simply the hard part.

     

    And the hard part can land anywhere. It doesn’t mean it isn’t worth doing.

     

    What is your creative cycle?

     

    As always, if you enjoyed this article, please feel free to share it. And if someone sent you this article and you liked it, you can sign up for more at Fine Art Views or my blog at LuannUdell.wordpress.com .

     

     

     

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