Many Galleries are Closed on Mondays . . .

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    This post is by Jason Horejs, regular contributing writer for FineArtViews. Jason Horejs and his wife, Carrie, own Xanadu Gallery in Scottsdale, AZ., which they founded in 2001. Jason also publishes RedDotBlog.com, a resource for artists interested in creating and strengthening relationships with galleries, as well as those looking to sharpen their own selling skills.

     

     

     

     

    On a Monday in May, I happened to be alone in the gallery. This isn’t usually the case, but my gallery director, Elaine, was out of town, and with the with the work schedule that week, it turned out that I was flying solo. This didn’t present a big problem because we were coming to the end of our spring busy-season, and traffic had already begun to slow down.

     

    I arrived at the gallery around 7:40 a.m., which is pretty typical, and began tackling a couple of big projects. After a while, I heard a rattling at the front door, and realized it was after ten and I hadn’t yet unlocked the front doors (evidence that perhaps I shouldn’t be allowed to fly solo!). I rushed to the front door just as a couple was walking away. I quickly unlocked the door and beckoned them back. It turned out that the had driven to the gallery from an outlying suburb some 35 miles away, on the recommendation of a friend. They had just purchased a new home and were looking for art.

     

    I began showing them around the gallery and telling them about the artwork on display. We had a great visit and they found the work of a particular artist that really spoke to them. I carefully began working toward a close. After they had selected three pieces they particularly liked, the wife said “this is our first time in Scottsdale, we want to visit a few other galleries before we make any decisions.”

     

    I understand this desire, and Xanadu was their first visit. I used a soft-close to get them to put the three pieces they liked on hold, and they told me they would be back after spending some time on the street looking at art. I also gave them a recommendation for lunch.

     

    One never knows what’s going to happen in this scenario, after all, I’m on a street with over 50 other galleries – there’s always the possibility that the client might find something they like better than what they’ve seen in my gallery. Fortunately, I don’t have to worry about this for several reasons. First, my highest priority is making sure that clients find the perfect piece of art for their home, even if this means that they find it in another gallery. Sure, it’s hard not to feel a bit envious when that happens, but I know that this attitude and approach creates positive energy and good karma. I’ve sent clients to a specific gallery before when I knew that the gallery had exactly what the client was seeking.

     

    The second reason I didn’t worry too much in this particular case was that the pieces the couple was interested in are very unique and striking. This art would compete extremely well with anything else the couple was likely to see in another gallery. I could tell that the couple were in love with the artist’s work.

     

    The third reason I didn’t worry was because it was Monday morning, and I have a competitive advantage on Monday mornings because a large number of galleries on Main Street in Scottsdale (where my gallery is located) are closed on Mondays!

     

    Sure enough, several hours later the couple came back. “Were you worried we wouldn’t return?” the wife asked.

     

    “Not at all!” I said, “I knew you would be back.”

     

    They laughed, and then said, “We saw some good art, but nothing compares to these. We’ll take them!”

     

    As I began writing up the sale, the wife commented to me, “a lot of the galleries were closed. I guess it’s worth being open on Monday’s for you!”

     

    I agreed as I ran her credit card. Definitely worth it.

     

    Because the couple was driving a small sports car, I told them I would be happy to deliver and install the pieces the next morning. They were thrilled.

     

    I asked if I could bring out any other pieces so they could see how they would look in the new home. There were several pieces, by the same artist they had just purchased, that they liked, but they weren’t sure they wanted to have more work by the same artist.

     

    Several hours later, however, the husband called and said they did want me to bring the additional pieces out when I came – if I was driving all that way, I might as well.

     

    Not bad for a Monday morning!

     

     

     

    To read Jason's full story and on how this applies to art or a gallery, continue to the original full article on RedDotBlog ....

     

     

     

     

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